Police Chief Craig Capri said the prayer vigil on Monday was to honor the recent victims of the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio as well as the victims of shootings in Daytona Beach.

Alexsandra Ramirez tries not to get scared about all the mass shootings in the United States but the recent gun violence that left dozens of people dead in El Paso and Dayton make the fear real, she said.

Ramirez and her mother, Obed Ford of Daytona Beach, took part in a prayer vigil the Daytona Beach Police Department held on Monday night in memory of the victims of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that left 29 people dead.

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On Aug. 3, a lone gunman, Patrick Crusius, 21, shot and killed 22 people and injured 24 more at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas.

Less than 24 hours later on Aug. 4, Connor Betts, 24, shot and killed his sister, then opened fire with an assault rifle killing ten people and injuring 27 others in downtown Dayton, Ohio.

“One of my friends was scared to go back to school because of the whole shooting thing that happened,” said Ramirez, 20, who studies at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona. “I’m pretty sure that this is going to stir up things when I get back to campus. There might be more lockdowns, more security going on down there.”

Police Chief Craig Capri said his heart breaks when he sees these tragedies and that authorities can’t do anything to stop it.

“We are dealing now in society with an element that has no regard for human life,” Capri said. “Color doesn’t matter, age doesn’t matter. These are violent, sick, deranged individuals that are looking to kill as many people as quick as possible.”

Capri said the prayer vigil on Monday was to honor the recent victims of the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio as well as the victims of shootings in Daytona Beach.

Capri urged the community at the vigil to work hard and unite and not be divided, come together as one front to combat evil.

“Evil wants to take us out,” Capri said. “We have something for them, we promise you that.”

Several pastors prayed asking for Gods’ guidance and presence in schools and Daytona Beach Mayor Derrick Henry urged the community to take action, to focus on the youth and reach out to help them.

“(We are not) the city that doesn’t experience the scourge of gun violence. We experience it way too often,” Henry said. “Something that we all should take into account and aspire to do is, ‘What are we going to do about it.?’ ’’

Ford said remembering the victims of the mass shootings is a noble thought but she can’t help getting upset about the senseless loss of life.

“As mothers we are always praying for our children. We don’t know if they are going to be safe in school when we send them or if they go to the mall if somebody is going to shoot them,” Ford said. “So it is very upsetting that these people died. I have two children. If that happened to my kids, that would shut my whole world down."