Crafted Concoctions will feature certified baristas serving gourmet coffee from Golden Hills Roasters in Groveland in a cozy space that is a clever fusion of, say, Starbucks and a speakeasy.

TAVARES — Rebecca Doherty was standing on a scaffold recently spreading thinset on a large wall that stretches the length of the storefront she’s renovating into a boutique coffee and cocktail bar, and as fatigue set in she wondered whether it was worth it.


Painstaking design and construction work is nothing new for Doherty. She and husband Craig Williamson labored months on the decor of their first business, Brü Tap House, on Main Street several years ago, and then did it again last year when they debuted BTW two storefronts away with an eclectic blend of salvaged items.


They do much of the work themselves, partly to save money but mostly to ensure that the creative details are executed faithfully to Rebecca’s vision.


But as Doherty sweated over the German schmear wall covering in her latest project, Crafted Concoctions by BTW, she lamented that perhaps she should have just paid someone to do it.


An admirer popped in while she was working — an admirer, it turns out, who is one of the creative people behind the Harry Potter ride at Universal Studios in Orlando.


How much money, she asked him, is she actually saving by doing the wall herself?


He contemplated the projected for a moment — the man hours, materials, etc – and estimated she saved herself $7,000.


She pumped her fist and smiled. “Yes, it was worth it,” she said.


Her patrons agree.


The do-it-yourself philosophy that guides Doherty’s crafty decors is also the guiding vision behind the culinary delights that attract foodies from as far away as Orlando. You won’t find run-of-the-mill beers at Brü, nor standard diner food at BTW, and you won’t find average coffee and cocktails at Crafted Concoctions when it opens later this year, she promises.


Jenny Deschenes, who serves as general manager for all three establishments, said it was the creativity and originality that prompted her to badger Doherty for a job two years ago.


“Honestly, it’s just the creative mind that Rebecca has,” Deschenes said. “Everything she does, she does over the top. She does things from scratch.”


Indeed. BTW’s menu is replete with creations born in Rebecca and Craig’s kitchen at home and honed over time until they were good enough to be encoded in the BTW kitchen bible. There is the Trailer Park taco (chicken crack with cabbage, cilantro and homemade ranch), the Gringo (a chorizo and beef blend with lettuce, tomato, sour cream and shredded cheese), and the Yolo, made with mac and cheese, beef, chorizo, bacon crumbles and scallions.


The couple plans to carry such originality into Crafted Concoctions, which will open in a former coffee house adjacent to BTW. There will be a doorway allowing patrons to drift between the bright, funky, family-friendly BTW and its grown-up sibling, Crafted Concoctions.


The doorway is all they share in common, though.


Crafted Concoctions will feature certified baristas serving gourmet coffee from Golden Hills Roasters in Groveland in a cozy space that is a clever fusion of, say, Starbucks and a speakeasy.


They will also serve up classic cocktails like Old Fashioneds and martinis but also offer original twists on old standbys — hence, crafted concoctions, like the “adult icees” that will ooze out of their ice shaver.


Serving gourmet cocktails will be the easy part, Doherty says. She was surprised at how much expense and expertise goes into creating a truly gourmet cup of coffee or an espresso. There are different pricey grinders for different blends of coffee and precise techniques that ensures optimal brewing. Even the outside temperature and humidity can affect a "pour,” she said.


A craft beer aficionado, Doherty admits brewing coffee can be far more complex.


“I had no idea,” she said. “The flavor profiles of coffee — way more than beer. Oh my gosh.”


And, as with the couple’s two other projects, the decor reflects the dual personality of the concoctions. The book wall — Doherty built a wall out of hard-bound books — says coffeehouse, while much of the art, the exposed brick and lighting will suggest a Prohibition-era speakeasy.


“I want people to have an open mind and welcome a place that’s going to blend old trends and new things,” she said. “Drinks might take a bit longer to make, but I promise they will be worth the wait.”