The billionaire dropped out of the presidential race Wednesday and endorsed Joe Biden, demonstrating the limits of money and the power of momentum on voter’s psyches.

Michael Bloomberg’s campaign opened a Sarasota campaign office to much fanfare on Feb. 15, drawing a crowd of roughly 250.


By Wednesday – 19 days later – the former New York City mayor had ended his presidential campaign.


That means the Sarasota office will have been open for less than three weeks, a warning to future presidential candidates about the strategy Bloomberg employed.


#apolloLink{color:#000;background-color:#F4BE11;text-shadow: none;padding: 8px 15px 10px;font-family: 'Roboto', sans-serif;font-weight: 600;border-radius:10px;}

SUPPORT LOCAL NEWS: Consider subscribing today


Florida figured prominently in Bloomberg’s campaign calculus, even though the state does not hold its presidential primary until March 17, which is 44 days after the Democratic nominating contest kicked off with the Iowa caucus.


A lot can happen in 44 days, as Bloomberg found out.


Former Vice President Joe Biden’s struggling campaign experienced a dramatic resurgence in South Carolina on Saturday, prompting two of his leading competitors to drop out and endorse him. On Wednesday Bloomberg did the same after winning just one primary – in America Samoa – and picking up few delegates.


Bloomberg skipped the four early voting states and bet that his money and a weakened Biden would lead to a strong performance on Super Tuesday and other states that vote in March – such as Florida - that would vault him into contention for the presidential nomination.


#apolloLink{color:#000;background-color:#F4BE11;text-shadow: none;padding: 8px 15px 10px;font-family: 'Roboto', sans-serif;font-weight: 600;border-radius:10px;}

See all of our politics news


Instead, Biden rode his South Carolina victory and the key endorsements of Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg and Beto O’Rourke to Super Tuesday dominance, demonstrating the limits of money and the power of momentum on voter’s psyches.


Bloomberg was playing the long game, investing tens of millions in Florida on advertising, more than 100 staffers and 20 campaign offices. But that investment proved to be worthless when Biden made it impossible for him to continue past Super Tuesday.